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20091101
20091130
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Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)
of the world's challenges cannot be solved unless the united states and china work together rts. >> reporter: but there was another challenge, how to address china's record on human rights. the president broached the topic at a town hall meeting with university students in shanghai earlier in the day. >> we do not seek to impose any system of government on any other nation. but we also don't believe that the principless that we stand for are unique to our nation. these freedoms of expression and worship, of access to information and political participation, we believe, are universal rights. they should be available to all people, including ethnic and religious minorities whether they are in the united states, china or any nation. >> reporter: following past practice for such events chinese authorities detained dozens of human rights activists in advance of the president's visit. mr. obama did not mention the crackdown but he did chide the chinese government for internet censorship. china has 250 million internet users but also employs the world's tightest controls over web access. >> i am a
think if you add up the troops that the united states will commit as well as those that nato countries are going to commit and that's still a work in progress on the latter. i'm told by senior defense officials that general mcchrystal will be more or less satisfied with the number that he believes he needs to do the counterinsurgency campaign that he laid out in his strategic assessment earlier this year. >> suarez: now, it takes a while to get everybody deployed, doesn't it? >> it does. it will take several months, actually several weeks for the first troops. but the marines that you mentioned will be going in first early next year to be followed soon after by a number of... several hundred perhaps up to a thousand army trainers. these will be doing the initial training of afghan recruits. the recruits will then be put into their units and partnered with american units on the ground. this will be a phased deployment going over the next 12 to 18 months. the troops that you mention in your broadcast, up to some 30,000 or so will be phased in over that time frame. >> suarez: once all tho
, including ethnic and regious minorities whether they e in the united states, cha or any nation. >> reporte following past actice for such event chinese ahorities detained dozens of human rits activists in vance of the presint's visit. mr. obama did not menti the crackdown but did chide the chine government for internet nsorship. china has 250 milon intert users but also employs the wod's tightest controls over web accs. >> i am a g believer in technoloy. and i'm a big liever in openns when it comes to the flow of informatn. i think that the morereely inrmation flows, the stronger the socie becom. because then citizens of countries arounthe world can hold their own governments accountable. ey can begin to think for themselves. that generates new ids. it encouages creativit >>orter: the president suggesteds communist rulers shou have nothing to fear fr more openness. heited criticism he faces at home. >> the truth is that becau in the united states information is free d i have a lot of itics in the uted states who can say all kinds of things out me, i actually think th that makes o democrac
-- and i would say enthusiastic role by the united states of america, these negotiations will not yield the kind of the kind of results that we are looking for. true, we would have hoped that the united states of america would have been more ambitious than what it has indicated. >> reporter: india is also one of the world's largest producers of greenhouse gas emissions, but is a relative newcomer to an industrialized economy. saran says the country has concerns that a climate agreement could stifle economic development. >> for us, climate change is not just a separate issue, it is intermixed with our developmental, you know, issues itself. so how we balance, you know, the problem of climate change with the other stresses and strains that the country is going through as this process of social and economic transformation, we would hope that there is some understanding of that challenge that we face. >> reporter: meantime, a series of studies released today in the british medical journal "the lancet" could give another boost to advocates of addressing climate change. the studies found that
but there is no question that commercial property in the united states is in bad shape it is going down. and there is a lot of genuine worries about that. dubai as a symbol might focus more attention next week but i think dubai is postly about emerging markets. our home problems are very much about the united states and they are very big and they are much bigger, actually, than the problems in dubai. >> warner: so the u.s. problems you think are a lot bigger. >> the total losses from the crisis so far worldwide which mostly concentrate on the united states $1.7 trillion. we're talking about credit losses in dubai of perhaps $20 billion. so that an order of magnitude, two orders of magnitude smaller in dubai than what we have seen in the united states. the additional problems in the united states are another 100, 200, 300 billion but they are coming on top of all these existing problems. they are coming into a banking system that is weak already in the united states. >> warner: so briefly do we have reason to be nervous by what happened today in dubai. >> yes, it should make us nervous. came at an ago waurd
to fulfil its obligations and eliminate its nuclear weapons program, the united states will support economic assistance and help promote its full integration in the community of nations. that opportunity and respect will not come with threats. north korea must live up to its obligations. >> reporter: that statement echoed president lee's offer of a "grand bargain"-- aid for the communist north in return for giving up nuclear weapons. >> the north koreans haven't yet conveyed what they thought of the grand bargain, but in order for the north koreans to ensure their stability, to improve the lives of the north korean population, to have economic prosperity, in short: for a better future for the north koreans, it is my wish that the north koreans adopt the grand bargain proposal. >> reporter: the offer came just a week after north and south korean ships exchanged fire near a disputed border in the yellow sea. neither president mentioned the sea clash today. instead, mr. obama announced he'll send an envoy to north korea next month-- the first direct talks between washington and pyongyang since
in the united states, significant announcent? >> yes, defitely. there had been a thoht that the president woulrefrain from putting anything psk on the table until the congre had acted. the house has acted if these numbers are in lin with what the hous has in their bill,ut the senate has just reportedded somethg out of comttee. nothing s reach the floor. so by putting h force behin these numbers, the presint is sort of settingp a negotiating line witthe congress and indicating probably what he feels is the minimu benth whenhesenate shouldn't go and a minimum of wt the world neez needs. a warming of three to four degreesahrenheit puts us in the nger zone as far as global warming is concerned, and these sorts of emissions reductions are consistentwith what we need to get od start combatting th warming. >> suarez: professor, ishat mething new for the united stes, specific ars and specific reduction perntages? >> back in the cnton administration, the u.s. did agree to specifiyears and specic reduction perntages, and they were emdied in the kyoto protocol whh president inton never sent up to t
threat to the united states. >> woodruff: we heard the president say today when the american people hear our rationale, we think they will come along. >> maybe. >> woodruff: that's what he made. >> maybe. a lot of that has to do with the perception of whether the united states can win there and people don't judge the military situation very well. and whether the afghanistan... the people in after dan stan... the afghanistan government can succeed after we've left. there are a a lot of doubts on the part of the public about that. >> woodruff: josh gerstein, pull some of this together. what are the political forces out there weighing on the president? >> here's what i think the basic problem is. it is that we may know by 2011 or 2012 whether the decision the president is about to announce is a success. we may know whether there's better traction for the u.s. mission in afghanistan. we're probably not going to know about the time members of congress face re-election in november of next year. in fact, not all the troops that the president is expected to send there will even be in country by
helped the hijackers reach the united states, then sent them $120 thousand dollars for expenses and flight training. the suspects have been held for as long as 5 years-- at secret sites and at guantanamo-- and have been subjected to harsh interrogations. khalid sheikh mohammed was reportedly water-boarded 183 times in 2003 before the practice was banned. but at today's news conference, attorney general holder said he was sure of convictions. >> the reality is-- and i want to be as assuring as i can-- that, based on all of my experience and based on all of the recommendations and the great work and the research that has been done, that i am quite confident that the outcomes in these cases will be successful ones. >> reporter: and in japan, president obama said he believes the u.s. federal courts are up to the job. >> i am absolutely convinced that khalid sheik mohammad will be subject to the most exacting demands of justice. the american people will insist on it and my administration will insist on it. >> reporter: the idea of bringing the detainees to the u.s. has already run in
from the cris so far worldwide which mostly concentrate on the united states $1.7 trillion. we're talkingbout credit sses in dubai o perhaps 0 billion. that an order of magnitude, tw orders of magnitude smaller in dubai than what we have senn the united states. the additional problems in the united states are another 100, 200,00 billion b they are coming on top of all these existing probls. they are comi into a banki system that is weak already in the uited states. >>warner: so briefly do we ve reason to be nervousby hat happened today in dubai. >> yes,t should make us nervou came at an ago waurd time. abu dhabi is closed for usiness until mondaso we don't know whateal they work ouuntil at least sunday. and if monday we have new rk opening without full relution of the issue, ithout total clarity it is going to be a difficult wee >> warner: si upon johnson of m.t. and the person institute, thank you so much. >> ank you. >> odruff: in other news today iran was censured r its nuclear pgram by the u.n.'s nuclear watch dog agency. 25 nations including cha and russia apoved the resol
these are men who are either legal residents of the united states or in some cases citizens of the united states. and the reason why the f.b.i. became so concerned is it was... it seemed to be a much broader attempt at attempting to radicalize people in the united states than they've really seen before. >> warner: how did the justice department first get wise to this. >> the interesting facet of this. essentially the families of many of the young men came forward to ask that the f.b.i. help in finding them. you know, many of these older relatives of the young men were concerned that this was going on. they had inklings but no concrete facts to base that on. they came to f.b.i. asking for help to find their sons. >> warner: these young men had just disappeared. >> in many cases, yes, they had essentially packed up and gone and the family feared the worst. >> warner: has it been absolutelyly established that as the charges lay out that some of these young men at least have shown up in somalia, they have gone to terrorist training camps? they have even engaged in combat? >> yes, there is one partic
's announcement of a new battle plan for afghanistan in a national address tuesday night from the united states military academy at west point. the military says it could include some 30,000 troops-- a roughly 50% increase in the number of u.s. forces there, but administration officials caution that the president has not settled on a final figure. in his thanksgiving address from the white house, mr. obama offered gratitude to troops overseas and their families. >> we keep in our thoughts and prayers the many families marking this thanksgiving with an empty seat, saved for a son or daughter, a husband or a wife stationed in harm's way. we say a special thanks for the sacrifices those men and women in uniform are making for our safety and freedom. >> reporter: president obama later made calls to 10 u.s. servicemen and women stationed in war zones to give his personal thanks. other nato leaders also are considering sending more troops to afghanistan, including german chancellor angela merkel. officials there were focused today on the forced resignations of the head of germany's armed forces and a
's alleged he hped the hijacks reach the united states, th sent them $120 thousand dollars forxpenses and flight training. theuspects have been held for as longas 5 years-- at secret tes and at guantanamo-- and have been subjecteto harsh interrotions. khalid eikh mohammed wa reportedly water-boarde183 times in 2003 beforthe practice was banned. but at tod's news conference, attoey general holder said he was sure of convictis. >> the reality is-- and i wt to be as suring as i can-- that, based on a of my experien and based on all of he recommendations and the gre work and the research that has been done, tt i am quite confident that the outmes in these ses will be successful ones. >> reporter: and i japan, presidt obama said he believes the u.s. federal cous are up to thjob. >> i am absolutelconvinced that khalid sheik mohammadill be subject to the most ecting emands of justice. the american peoplwill insist on and my administrationill insist on i >> reporr: the idea of brging the detainees to the u.s. has ready run into restance. >> this is one of e most disgracef decisions any prsid
. the united states and its allies came to afghanistan after september 11. afghanistan was troubled before that too. so they're here to fight the terrorism. so that's -- we share that, and of course we need to build afghanistan and need to be able to defend themselves and to stand on its own feet and to do good for its people. that is an afghan responsibility trilaterally to get to where we want to be in terms of a better government, a better society. a plan that delivers the services to the afghan people. >> margaret: your foreign minister issued a statement saying that they considered the statements from some of these to be interference and lack of respect for afghan sovereignty. do you see it that way? >> well, we must all be very careful while we are partners with one another while we work together, while we are travelling this journey together. but our partnership and our advice is a friendly one and with good intentions and not one that can be interpreted any other way. >> margaret: and did you feel that president obama and gordon brown and kai eide crossed the line? >> well, i've he
thought a second-term karzai was a credible partner for the u.s. and its allies. >> the united states and the international community based on the experience they've had in the past few years to make that judgment. but there is no doubt that the international community, to make success, to turn this into a success, they do need credible and reliable partners. >> warner: abdullah denied making any last-minute deal with karzai. but he said another player in the election drama, the taliban, which waged attacks on voters and election workers alike, had influenced his choice. >> when i made that decision security was not the sole reason. that was a reason. lives are involved in this. lives are not just devoted but those who are providing security for us. >> warner: last night scott wharton, whose u.n.-affiliated electoral complaints commission, rang the bell on the fraud in the first round said there was no road map to determine the next step. >> the electoral law is not entirely clear on how to handle a withdrawal in the second round. >> warner: so the constitution and the election laws c
. it is here to fight the war on terror. the united states and its allies came to afghanistan after september 11. afghanistan was troubled like hell before that, too. nobody bothered about us. >> ifill: afterward, published reports said those remarks rankled american officials as they wrestle with sending more troops to afghanistan. president obama has been weighing options for months, and today, in china, he talked about it with cnn. >> i will announce that decision certainly in the next several weeks. the pieces involved number one, making sure that the american people understand we do have a vital interest in making sure that al qaeda cannot attack us and that they can't use afghanistan as a safe haven. we have a vital interest in making sure that afghanistan is sufficiently stable that it can't infect the entire region with violent extremism. >> ifill: that decision will come as public support for the afghan war continues to fall. a "washington post"-abc news poll published today found 52% of americans now believe the war has not been worth fighting. support for the war in other nato-memb
allies. >> the united states and the internationacommunity based on the expernce they've had in t past few years to make that judgment. but the is no doubt that the international mmunity, to make success, to turn this into a success, they do ned credible and reliab partners. >> warner: abdullah deed making any last-minute deal with kari. but he said another player in the election drama, the taliban, which wagedttacks on voters and electn worker alike,ad influeed h chce. >> when i made that decision security was not t sole reason. that was a reason. lives are involved in this. lives arnot just devoted but those who are providing security for us. >> warner: last night scott wharto whose u.n.-affiliad electoral complaints commission, rang t bell on the fraud in the fir round said there was no road mapto deteine the xt step. >> the electorallaw is not enrely clear on how handle a withdrawal in the second round. >> warner: so the cotitution and e election laws carefully written ashey were dinot anticipate this? >> idid not. the i.e.c. is responsible for writing regutions that determine all
of the recent book "the fourth star: four generals and the epic struggle for the future of the united states army." greg jaffe, thank you for being with us. >> thanks. >> woodruff: why are all these recommendations on afghanistan being paid public. is this what the administration wants. >> i think that is probably the last thing that they want right now. but it's been a long, drawn-out process. it's a huge decision for this president and this administration. somewhat of a contentious process. i think there are strong feelings on both sides in terms of how many troops you should send, how long they should be there, what they should be doing. so just one of these natural kind of things that tends to happen in washington when you have competing bureaucracies, competing priorities, you tend to get a lot of leaks. >> woodruff: so it really is as messy as, i don't know, what adjective would you use, how would you describe the process? >> you know, it is certainly complicated. it has certainly gone on for a while. i don't know if messy is the right one to use am they do seem to be moving to a decis
if i'm the bad cop. what i'm trying to do is callq what i see here is the united states getting sucked into a situation, into a war that has no end. you know, i have repeatedly called for an exitç with regard to our military. you know, i believe if you're going to go to war0y have a clearly defined mission. i don't think we have a clearly defined mission in afghanistan. a clearly defined mission is a beginning, a middle, a transition period and an end. i've asko point does our military contribution to the2d solution in afghanistan come to an end? we could bring our troops home. i'm not looking for a date ser. i would like someone to tell me how this has a happy ending. our mission in afghanistan is very different than it was when/+ congress authorized the use of force against al qaeda after 2001. we have... this whole mission is very, very different. we should have a5 debate on this. i think the policy should be re-evaluated in its entire tee.? mistake to expand our military footprint there. i think it would... and especially in the aftermath of this election. i don't want our americ
. the united states and itsllies came to afanistan after septemb 11. afghanistanas troubled before that too. so they're herto fight the teorism. so that's -- we share that, and of course we need to bud afanistan and need toe able to defend themselves and to stand its own feet and to do good for its people. that is anfghan responsibility trilaterally to get to wre we want to bin terms of a better government, a better socty. a planhat delivers the services to the afghan peopl >> margaret: your foregn minister issed a statement saying that theyconsidered the statements from som of these t be terference a lack of respect forafghan sovereigny. do you seet that way? >>ell, we must all be very careful while we arepartners wi one another while we work together, while were travelling this journey together. but our partnership and ou advice is a friendly one and with good intentions and t one that can be interpreted y other way. >> margaret: and did you el that preside obama and gordon brown and kaeide crossed the line? >> well, i've heard so much of that. itdoesn'tother me. > margaret: so was the forei
resints of thenited states or in some case citizens of t united stats. and the reaso why the f.b.i. became so ccerned is it was... it seed to be a ch broader attempt a attpting to radicalize peoplen the united states than they've really seen bere. >> warner: h did the justice departnt first get wise to this >> the interesng facet of this. essentially the fmilies of many of the young men came forward to ask that the f.b.i. help i finding them. you know, many ofhese older relativeof the young men were concern that this w gong on. they had inklings but no concrete facts to base that on. they came to b.i. asking for help to find theirons. >> warner: these young men had just dappeared. >> many cases, yes, they had esstially packed upnd gone and the family feared the rst >> waer: has it been absolutely established tat as t charges lay ou that some of these yung men at least haveshown up in somalia, they have go to terrorist training cps? theyave even engaged in combat? >> yes, there is one partularly grsome piece of evidence that e f.b.i. has tested. that is the remains of one of the men were r
be is this an attack on the united states? the united states army? or is it a personnel issue. >> right. and there's no way to know that now. i think the army has discouraged people from trying to draw a cause and effect here. and i want to honor that. i don't want to say there may be a cause and effect. but i think what you... in reporting reporting this story, the context of an army that's been very stressed is unavoidable and clearly just from my own reporting on fort hood you can tell this army is under a lot of stress. whether it has anything to do with this, i don't know. >> brown: i understand. but tell us what you have been been looking at. people will clearly be looking at the pablt of trauma. especially senator just said this is a soldier that was about to be going to iraq. >> again, we'll talk in generalities here. but, you know, because the army was not anticipated to be fighting two wars for this long period, in fact, the all-volunteer force was never anticipated to be sort of a wartime full wartime prolonged war force, it was going to... from its inception it was designed to be the c
here in the united states. >> repter: investigators say awlaki and san exchanged 10 to 20 electronic messages er the past year. and by december olast year, the f.b.i. knew it. but in a statement ised monday, t f.b.i. said it dermined: "the ntent of those ommunications was consistent with research beg conducted by hasan in his pition psychiatrist the walter reed medic center." and took no action. th same day, awlaki's web si praid the shooting as a "great heroic act" and encouraged others to do the sam "dal hassan is a hero," the posting sad. "he is a man of conscience ho could not bear living e contradiction of beg a muslim and seing in an army that is fighting agait his own people." authoritiesirst looked at awlaki a deca ago, for possib connections to al qae. ter 9-11, the commission investigating the attac homed n on the fact that he'd coueled three of the hijackers whilserving as imam at mosques san diego and falls, church virginia. former deputy torney general jamie golick said she and her llow commissioners found the coincidence troublg. >> denied to the f.b.i. any significan
the war on terr. the united states and itsllies came to ahanistan after seember 11. afghanistan was troubled le hel before that, too. nobody bothed about us. >> ifill: afterward, ublished reportsaid those remarks rankled amican officials as they wrestle with sending me troops to afghastan. presidentbama has been wghing options for months, an today, in chinahe talked about with cnn. >> i will announce at decision cerinly in the next several weeks. thpieces involved number one, making sure that t american people understand weo have a vital interest in mang sure that al qaeda cannot attk us and that thecan't use afghastan as a safe haven. we have a vital interesin making re that afghanistan is sufficiently stablehat it can't infect the entire reon with violent extremism >>fill: that decision will comes public support for the afghan war continues fall. a "washinon post"-abc news poll publishedtoday found 52% of americans now belve the war has not beenorth fighting. suort for the war in other nato-member nations isower still. but the alliance said tod it lans a meeting next month to
was the legal procedure in ace, and the united states has to usits levera to get it right. >> warr: and do you think the u.s. s enough leverage to make prident karzai do what you think he doe't have the political will to do? >> i wil not be able to judge it from my position. but e answer is that without pressg for reform can we all succeedn this sort of sittion, the answer is no. >> warner: a you'll be pressing f reform from the tside? >> i will, i will. >> wner: an aide to you described this as hang been a very painful d emotional time. >> oh, i think certnly, i exercise with all its up an downs, ups and wns and with a lot of disappointments in between, but i think thpeople of afanistan have learned something about it. they've gone through sothing and i thini will have the pport of the people in the pursuit of those ide. >> warner: doctor abdullah thank you. >> you're welcome. >> lehrer: nextonight ... those tv talks... and eir impact on how the rest of us "talk" politic jeffrey bwn reports. >> ift wasn't for fox or talk radio, we'd be ne as a republic. >> repter: in a multi-media world ofalk
in their home country. and while they now feel safe in the united states, some fear that if their faces are shown on tv, relatives back home may face reprisals. >> you cannot live as a christian there. it's difficult. we have always to be worried, to be careful. >> reporter: like other refugees, these two who gave just their first names are thankful to have found sanctuary even if economic security appears elusive. >> you know, living here is expensive. especially we don't have a job. all the time it's hard or difficult. >> reporter: that's a common story among new arrivals. government funded resettlement agencies on contract with the u.s. state department are finding themselves overwhelmed by the large numbers of refugees. the government provides medical care and cash assistance for the first eight months. afterwards refugees can apply for welfare. but the support is falling short of the need. >> without the green card. >> reporter: michael mckay, head of the catholic charities office in san diego, says in this economy entry-level jobs that in the past were available for refugees don't
think he's bn very careful not to publicly embrace the united states, frankly. there's been a lot of friction between th two counies, especially between t election and e fraud that took place there and he is... he is trying to be... avd the perception that he ia puppet the amerian government. when you hear himtalk about what he wants, he wants the support of the sbeshational community butt's in order to strengthen his own ministration, it's to sengthen his afghan ar and this speech, his inauguration speech, he said he wants afghan security fores to take full corol of the security in the countrin five years and many people think that' a pretty ambitious goal but he said he want international private security coanies out at two years. he wants amicans out of running the detention center he wants more inrnational funding going tough the afghan budget, up to about hf of intertional funding in a couple years. so he's... 's trying to strengthen hi own administration throug whatever suport, additial support he gets from the unitedtates. >> woodruf and, josh palow, we've heard the the gh
persecution in teir home county. and whi they now feel safe in e united states, me ar that i their fes are shown on tv, relatives back homeay fac repsals. >> you cnot live as a christian there. it's difficult. have always toe worried, to be careful. >> report: like other efugees, these two who gave just their first names are thankful to have found sanuary even if economic security appears elive. >> youknow, living he is exnsive. especially we n't have a job. all e time it's hard or difficult. >>reporter: that's a common story among new rivals. vernment funded resettleme agencies o contract with the u.s. state depament are inding themselves overwhelm by the rge numbers of refugees. theovernment prodes medical re a cash assistance for the fir eight mont. afterwards refugees can apply for welfar t the support is lling sht of the need. >> without the green card. >> reporter: michaelckay head of the catholic charitie office inan diego, says in this economy entry-level jobs that i the past were ailable for refugees d't exst. housing cots are hh. and milies are crowdingnto shareapartments. >>
? >> reporter: his ceramics teacher, abdul manan, believes only the united states and its allies can make karzai deliver. >> ( translated ): i am requesting from the international community to put pressure on him, to bring changes. the people are tired of his past five years-- corruption, fighting, people are tired of this. >> president karzai has always acted as a tribal chieftain, a traditional leader who wants to build... >> reporter: haroun mir, who runs a think tank in kabul, says karzai's style makes him ill- suited to satisfy today's demands from afghans or the international community. >> this is probably the weakness of president karzai that he wants to satisfy everybody instead of looking for results. i don't think president karzai would bring any change on his own. i think the international community will be forced to bring constantly pressure. >> reporter: but hekmat karzai, a distant cousin who informally advises president karzai, says he expects the afghan president to mend his ways. >> within the first three to six months, we will know how committed and how serious he is in terms o
, while we recognize that tibet is part of the people's republic of china, the united states supports the early resumption of dialogue between the chinese government and representatives of the dalai lama to resolve any concerns and differences that the two sides may have. >> holman: the president did not meet with the dalai lama when the tibetan leader visited washington this fall. today, a white house spokesman said a meeting would come "at an appropriate time." >> what a magnificent place to visit. >> holman: in the meantime, mr. obama spent some time today touring the icy cobblestone courtyards of beijing's forbidden city. the president said he hoped his visit would help him understand china better, but he acknowledged, future relations with china "will not be without disagreement or difficulty." >> lehrer: we'll go further into human rights in china later in the program. also, we have a slideshow of images from past state visits to china on our web site, newshour.pbs.org. and historian richard norton smith discusses the issues other presidents have faced. in other news today, glob
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)